Category Archives: wildlife merchandise

Blue Tuna, original painting and 12 oz. mugs

three mugs with painting

Blue Tuna mugs with the original painting.

These are 12 oz. glazed ceramic mugs with the my painting “Blue Tuna” dye-sublimated into the surface. I am selling them individually, but will also a set of two or all three; see below. I photographed them with the framed original painting that was used to create the artwork.

mug with blue tuna painting

Section 1 of the mug.

This painting was an experiment on a “velour” style of pastel drawing paper. I wanted to get both the smooth transitions of light and dark in water, and the clarity of the reflections without really hard edges. Because the tuna are in fairly deep water, the ripple reflections are a little soft on the edges, and the velour helped to carry that.

mug with blue tuna painting

Section 2 of the painting.

The reproduction on the mugs is a little deeper and more vibrant than the original painting, but after seeing the proofs of these mugs I decided I liked it even though it wasn’t accurate to the original painting.

mug with blue tuna painting

Section 3 of the painting.

All three mugs are identical, but the design wraps around so I photographed it in three sections. Hope there’s no confusion!

If you would like a set of two mugs for $18.00 or three for $25.00, please let me know. I will fill your order if enough mugs are left.

Find them in my Etsy shop.

Original Painting

The original painting is also for sale in my Etsy shop. The painting is 18″ wide x 12″ high with a 6″ wide double slate-blue mat with blue core and 1″ wide silver metal frame with a beaded inner edge.

 

frame and mat on painting

Frame and mat on Blue Tuna.

If you’d like the painting and the mugs, please let me know and I’ll give you a deal on the whole thing!

And you can also purchase this painting as a print in various sizes and formats, and as a 5″ x 7″ greeting card in my Fine Art America gallery.

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Taking Flight, a Summer Afternoon in the Marsh

pastel painting of whooping cranes

Taking Flight © original pastel painting, B.E. Kazmarski

Above is “Taking Flight”, an original pastel painting of two whooping cranes taking off in a marsh on a summer afternoon. Visiting what had once been their habitat on Assateague Island, Virginia, I imagined what they might have looked like in the whispering marshes as I watched the other cranes and egrets as I enjoyed the quiet rustling breezes of the marsh.

Studying a wild animal in its natural habitat is a reminder that the world does not revolve around us, that these creatures have their own lives and are not primarily subjects for our entertainment or sport. And while, for me, the inspiration to put an image on paper is always primarily a visual inspiration, wild animals carry the same emotional inspiration as domestic pets—animals are so un-selfconscious and don’t care what the artist does with them. Add to that the beauty of a natural landscape and you’ve got a perfect recipe for visual pleasure.

detail of whooping cranes painting

Detail of cranes.

I have traveled too little to see any real wildlife aside from the critters who inhabit my suburban garden, but the Pittsburgh Zoo and National Aviary in Pittsburgh are quite impressive places of natural habitat, and we also have conservation sites to visit in the western part of Pennsylvania where endangered species are kept in hopes they’ll breed enough to carry on their species, so I do get to see these species in life aside from the many magazines and visit websites I learn from.

Many years ago I saw two captive whooping cranes, likely at the Pittsburgh Zoo. I marveled at their size—they were nearly as tall as me! But it was when one of them spread its wings that I was truly enchanted by the pure white body, neat brown wing tips and tiny touches of yellow highlight here and there, and the grace of that huge bird.

And I read about them and discovered their plight, having no idea they were so imperiled, I remembered again that visit to Assateague Island.

detail of painting

Detail of marsh grasses and sky.

What would their afternoon have been like? Using my photos of those marshes and many images of whooping cranes plus another visit to the Zoo, I painted this in pastel, trying to capture the details that had stayed with me at seeing them, and also the feeling of movement in the marshes I had visited, the waving sedges, lapping water and constant breeze from the ocean.

And those summer colors, blue sky reflected on the water, reflected on the cranes.

detail of painting

Detail of water.

The painting is 23″ wide x 15″ high, matted with a 4″ warm cream acid-free mat with 1/4″ burnished gold wood fillet edging and 1-1/4″ burnished gold frame. The backing is acid-free foam core and the glass is premium clear glass.

You can find the original painting, “Taking Flight”,  along with a number of other wildlife paintings.

Prints are available, both a full-size high-quality giclee: www.etsy.com/listing/104435028/taking-flight-whooping-cranes-giclee, and an 18″ x 12″ digital print.: www.etsy.com/listing/104435800/taking-flight-whooping-cranes-digital.

I’m happy to be donating a print of this painting to Operation Migration, the non-profit that teaches Whooping Crane chicks the migration route from Wisconsin to Florida, for their benefit in September. Read about the difficult but rewarding effort this organization puts forth to help reintroduce this endangered species to their original lifestyle and pattern of migration.


A Really Big Kitty

framed linoleum block print of leopard

Yes?

“Yes?”

Who doesn’t love a leopard’s spots? Some subjects, such as this one, are meant for the stark clarity of block printing. This particular leopard was at the zoo, but she managed to keep her dignified bearing in questioning why I was so intent on her behind—I was actually trying to get a closeup photo of her spots for future reference, but when she turned around I knew I had the best shot for this.

Block printing is a technique wherein the artist carves the surface of a piece of linoleum, leaving raised areas which will become the image. Ink is rolled onto these raised areas, then a piece of paper is pressed against the block and when it’s lifted away the ink remains, leaving the image on the paper.

block print of leopard

Yes?

I also currently have this print unframed, printed in black on white rice paper.

I also print this image on textiles, such as t-shirts, curtains, tablecloths, shawls and tote bags! Please check my apparel and housewares categories to see what’s currently available, and I’ll be sure to post new things here as I do them.

Because of the nature of the medium, each print is unique and ink coverage is not always perfect. Most artists consider this random activity to be part of the process of creating an individualized print, and along with the hand-painting makes a unique work of art.

Image is 7.5″ x 10″, framed in an 8.5″ x 11″ plain black frame with glass. You can find her in my Etsy shop, and also browse other linoleum block prints, giclees and digital prints and original art.

This print is also in my shop in Carnegie Antiques at 423 West Main Street in Carnegie. Stop in and visit me on Wednesdays, 11 to 3!


Polar Bears and Snow

pastel painting of polar bear family asleep in snow

Asleep in the Snow © original pastel by B.E. Kazmarski

Today I’m featuring polar bears, one of my favorite subjects; I’ve painted several and these two are the only originals I have left, one large and one small.

“Asleep in the Snow” is an original pastel painting of a polar bear family settling down in the snow at sunset. This painting was drawn from many photos of snow, of Alaska, of polar bears, but mostly from visits to the Pittsburgh Zoo and PPG Aquarium which has a renowned polar bear exhibit. The basic composition was from one photo I had seen, wondering at the stark, quiet, even threatening beauty of the Arctic that the polar bears endured on a daily basis. It is matted and framed, $350.00 plus shipping—please visit “Asleep in the Snow” in my Etsy shop for all the details of size, mat and frame.

watercolor of polar bear in snow

White? © original watercolor by B.E. Kazmarski

This painting is “White?”—we know that snow and polar bears are both white, right? I can assure you there’s not one speck of white anywhere in this piece. In addition to being a dedication to polar bears, it’s also a comment on the perception of color. It’s a small original watercolor sketch painted from photo references, matted and framed and an affordable $50.00—please visit  “White?” in my Etsy shop for the details of size, mat and frame.

Studying a wild animal in its natural habitat is a reminder that the world does not revolve around us, that these creatures get along just fine (and probably better) without us, that we are really only one more species carrying out our lives on Earth. And while, for me, the inspiration to put an image on paper is always primarily a visual inspiration, wild animals carry the same emotional inspiration as domestic pets—animals are so un-selfconscious. Add to that the beauty of a natural landscape and you’ve got a perfect recipe for visual pleasure.

I’ve sold prints of these pieces and I love having the originals hanging in my studio, but in reading more and more about the plight of endangered species, especially polar bear habitat, I need to make room for some new pieces to interpret what’s happening now.

I have reduced the prices on these pieces to make them more affordable for those who want a touch of the wild in their home.

These pieces are available matted, framed and ready to hang. The full details of size dimension and mat and frame are available along with several others in my Etsy shop under “Original Art”.


Whooping Cranes, a Summer Afternoon in the Marsh

pastel painting of whooping cranes

Taking Flight © original pastel painting, B.E. Kazmarski

Above is “Taking Flight”, an original pastel painting of two whooping cranes taking off in a marsh on a summer afternoon. Visiting what had once been their habitat on Assateague Island, Virginia, I imagined what they might have looked like in the whispering marshes.

Studying a wild animal in its natural habitat is a reminder that the world does not revolve around us, that these creatures get along just fine (and probably better) without us, that we are really only one more species carrying out our lives on Earth. And while, for me, the inspiration to put an image on paper is always primarily a visual inspiration, wild animals carry the same emotional inspiration as domestic pets—animals are so un-selfconscious. Add to that the beauty of a natural landscape and you’ve got a perfect recipe for visual pleasure.

I have traveled too little to see any real wildlife aside from the critters who inhabit my suburban garden, but the Pittsburgh Zoo is quite an impressive place of natural habitat and we also have conservation sites to visit in the western part of Pennsylvania where endangered species are kept in hopes they’ll breed enough to carry on their species. I also read many magazines and visit websites to learn about these species and reference pictorial resources.

Many years ago I saw two captive whooping cranes, likely at the Pittsburgh Zoo. I marveled at their size—they were nearly as tall as me! But it was when one of them spread its wings that I was truly enchanted by the pure white body, neat brown wing tips and tiny touches of yellow highlight here and there, and the grace of that huge bird.

And I read about them and discovered their plight, having no idea they were so imperiled, I remembered again that visit to Assateague Island.

What would their afternoon have been like? Using my photos of those marshes and many images of whooping cranes, I painted this in pastel, trying to capture the details that had stayed with me at seeing them, and also the feeling of movement in the marshes I had visited, the waving sedges, lapping water and constant breeze from the ocean.

And those summer colors, blue sky reflected on the water, reflected on the cranes.

The painting is 23″ wide x 15″ high, matted with a 4″ warm cream acid-free mat with 1/4″ burnished gold wood fillet edging and 1-1/4″ burnished gold frame. The backing is acid-free foam core and the glass is premium clear glass.

In July, 2011 I’ve reduced the price from $400 to $300 to make sure the whooping cranes find a place in someone’s home or office, and to make room for more artwork.

I also offer this as a digital print and a giclee.

You can find this painting in my Etsy shop under “Original Art” along with a number of other wildlife paintings.


His Majesty, the Gray Wolf

matted framed pastel painting of a gray wolf in a snowstorm

His Majesty, the Gray Wolf

Now there’s a look that will put us mere humans in our places. I combined images of wolves and their habitat to do a quick sketch, focusing on the unworried, unhurried expression. Wolves know they are near the food chain, and we don’t really worry them.

I painted it in pastel on acid-free Canson drawing paper in one of the threaded dusky green shades that reminds me so much of leaf litter in the woods. The mat is 2-1/2″ on all sides in slate blue black core to pull the cool tones from the snow, and the frame is solid cherry to pull the warm tones  from the wolf.

I painted this in 1994, and it’s been in so many shows and been so admired—and I’ve sold so many smaller prints and notecards and even mugs with this image—that it’s hard to believe the original has never sold. I’d love to find a home for His Majesty in this new year. I’ve reduced the price from $150 to $100 plus $15.95 shipping and handling. Visit my Etsy shop to order His Majesty, The Gray Wolf.


His Majesty, the Gray Wolf

matted framed pastel painting of a gray wolf in a snowstorm

His Majesty, the Gray Wolf

Now there’s a look that will put us mere humans in our places. I combined images of wolves and their habitat to do a quick sketch, focusing on the unworried, unhurried expression. Wolves know they are near the food chain, and we don’t really worry them.

I painted it in pastel on acid-free Canson drawing paper in one of the threaded dusky green shades that reminds me so much of leaf litter in the woods. The mat is 2-1/2″ on all sides in slate blue black core to pull the cool tones from the snow, and the frame is solid cherry to pull the warm tones from the wolf.

I painted this in 1994, and it’s been in so many shows and been so admired—and I’ve sold so many smaller prints and notecards and even mugs with this image—that it’s hard to believe the original has never sold. I’d love to find a home for His Majesty in this new year. I’ve reduced the price from $150 to $100 plus $10.00 shipping and handling. You can find this and purchase it in my shop on Etsy: His Majesty, Gray Wolf, Original Pastel.


Wildlife Artwork on Sale

pastel painting of whooping cranes

Taking Flight © original pastel painting, B.E. Kazmarski

Gray wolves and polar bears and whooping cranes, oh my! Well, the whooping cranes aren’t very threatening, but they are endangered and are one of the species I have read about and studied, interpreting my findings in a pastel painting. All four of these pieces are available matted, framed and ready to hang. The full details of size dimension and mat and frame are available in my Etsy shop under “Original Art”. You can click on the title or the image to link to the post on Etsy.

Above is “Taking Flight”, an original pastel painting of two whooping cranes taking off in a marsh on a summer afternoon. Visiting what had once been their habitat on Assateague Island, Virginia, I imagined what they might have looked like in the whispering marshes.

Studying a wild animal in its natural habitat is a reminder that the world does not revolve around us, that these creatures get along just fine (and probably better) without us, that we are really only one more species carrying out our lives on Earth. And while, for me, the inspiration to put an image on paper is always primarily a visual inspiration, wild animals carry the same emotional inspiration as domestic pets—animals are so un-selfconscious. Add to that the beauty of a natural landscape and you’ve got a perfect recipe for visual pleasure.

pastel painting of polar bear family asleep in snow

Asleep in the Snow © original pastel by B.E. Kazmarski

“Asleep in the Snow” is an original pastel painting of a polar bear family settling down in the snow at sunset. This painting was drawn from many photos of snow, of Alaska, of polar bears, but the basic composition was from one photo I had seen, wondering at the stark, quiet, even threatening beauty of the Arctic that the polar bears endured on a daily basis.

I’ve sold prints of these pieces and I love having the originals hanging in my studio, but in reading more and more about the plight of endangered species, especially polar bear habitat, I need to make room for some new pieces to interpret what’s happening now. I have reduced the prices on these pieces to make them more affordable for those who want a touch of the wild in their home.

watercolor of polar bear in snow

White? © original watercolor by B.E. Kazmarski

I’ve painted polar bears several times, fascinated by the “white” of the bears and snow. This painting is “White?”—we know that snow and polar bears are both white, right? I can assure you there’s not one speck of white anywhere in this piece. In addition to being a dedication to polar bears, it’s also a comment on the perception of color. It’s a small original watercolor sketch painted from photo references.

I have traveled too little to see any real wildlife aside from the critters who inhabit my suburban garden, but the Pittsburgh Zoo is quite an impressive place of natural habitat and we also have conservation sites to visit in the western part of Pennsylvania where endangered species are kept in hopes they’ll breed enough to carry on their species. I also read many magazines and visit websites to learn about these species and reference pictorial resources.

matted framed pastel painting of gray wolf

His Majesty, Gray Wolf © original pastel by B.E. Kazmarski

I don’t think I’d be so calm if I had been walking along a trail and met “His Majesty, Gray Wolf”, but I did want to capture the essence of the wolfish expression, and again, there’s snow, one of my favorite subjects with or without wildlife.

pastel painting of tuna underwater

Blue Tuna © original pastel by B.E. Kazmarski

But I have always found “Blue Tuna” to be a very calming piece to be around. I am captivated by underwater scenes and water reflections and kept this as monochromatic as possible.

These four originals are ones that would be reasonable to ship, but I have other wildlife originals as well as prints of just about all of my wildlife pieces, large and small. You can see more on my website in “fine art>wildlife”, but the prices you see aren’t accurate—they’re now on sale at my Etsy shop. I’d love to know that these originals were hanging in the home, office or other collection of someone who enjoyed looking at them and had a feeling for the species.

Again, all four of these pieces are available matted, framed and ready to hang. The full details of size dimension and mat and frame are available in my Etsy shop under “Original Art”.


Linoleum Block Print, Near and Far Away

block print

Near and Far Away, linoleum block print © B.E. Kazmarski

Today I saw a group of blackbirds harassing a red-tailed hawk as they all flew overhead in a small group. The nerve of those birds! They were swirling around, under and over, slapping the hawk with their wings, pulling feathers out of the hawk’s wings. I’m not sure why they do this but I’ve read smaller birds, such as wrens, will “draft” the hawk, fly in its wake and be pulled along.

This little block print was inspired by seeing the similarity of these shapes up in the sky. On the left, the wren “drafts” the red-tailed hawk, rising higher than the tiny wren could ever achieve on its own. On the right, Venus as the evening star in February appears next to the new moon.

Again, just a little illustration, and in this case I didn’t begin with a finished drawing and transfer it onto the block. Instead I sketched directly onto the block then began to cut as if I was drawing with the linoleum gouge.

It’s a tiny linoleum block print in black on white silk paper made of recycled cotton fiber with white silk threads embedded in it and flecks of gold and silver foil randomly sprinkled throughout. The art size is 2″ x 4″.

Block printing is a technique wherein the artist carves the surface of a piece of linoleum, leaving raised areas which will become the image. Ink is rolled onto these raised areas, then a piece of paper is pressed against the block and when it’s lifted away the ink remains, leaving the image on the paper.

I print this one on all sorts of paper in all sorts of ink colors–lime green paper with purple ink, for instance–and I often add color to any print with watercolors. I’ve also printed it on t-shirts. You can find it in my shop on Etsy or if you are local to me I actually have these on display in my shop in Carnegie, in the back room at Carnegie Antiques, 423 West Main Street.


Busy Chickadees, Linoleum Block Print

linocut of chickadees on a branch

Busy Chickadees, linocut © B.E. Kazmarski

Those little chickadees—I don’t know how they get anything accomplished when they are always hopping about and chick-a-dee-dee-ing. I have feeders outside each window and in the winter the cheerful chirps and constant activity among the bare and graceful branches are welcome.

This is a long and narrow linoleum block print in black on white rice paper with a tint of gray on the birds. It’s matted with a tan black-core top mat and a turquoise black-core bottom mat, framed with a black wood frame with a rustic edge. The art size is 12″W x 4″H, the frame size is 16″W x 8″H.

detail of print

Detail of print.

I have fun with this print. I kept the design fairly plain and spare so that I can sometimes add other colors to the background but more often mat and frame it in other color combinations and other frame styles and colors.

Block printing is a technique wherein the artist carves the surface of a piece of linoleum, leaving raised areas which will become the image. Ink is rolled onto these raised areas, then a piece of paper is pressed against the block and when it’s lifted away the ink remains, leaving the image on the paper.

You can find this set of prints in my Etsy shop, or if you are local to me I actually have these on display in my shop in Carnegie, in the back room at Carnegie Antiques, 423 West Main Street.


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